Golden Eggs in the Wildflower Garden

Wildflowers on the Hill

Wildflowers on the Hill

I’ve shared previously pictures of the patch of wildflowers that are growing on the hillside right now.  Dominated by Larkspur, Cornflowers, Daisies, and Poppies it’s an eclectic mix of delightful colors.  Seated on the bench it provides a nice colorful introduction to the pasture and the pines beyond.  In addition Beth takes stem cuttings from these flowers to refill the various small vases throughout the house.  The other day the cuttings she took came with an additional bonus — some golden eggs that we have never seen before.  I’m thinking now that we should have saved them to see what they developed into…

Golden Eggs on Wildflowers

Golden Eggs on Wildflowers

Golden Eggs from unknown insect

Golden Eggs from Unknown Insect

A few years back Josh and I chose a “Lady in Red” Hydrangea for Beth’s Mother’s Day gift.  It has been on the porch ever since.  This year it has really come into its own.  In addition to pretty reddish foliage when it first emerges the flowers are a lovely light pink shading to violet.  They make nice cut flowers as well.  So far it seems to be quite happy living in the pot year round.

Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Lady in Red’

Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Lady in Red’

Hydrangea 'Lady in Red' Flower

Hydrangea 'Lady in Red' Flower

I should also note that the newest Ponerorchis (obtained from Asiatica on the open house visit) has flowered and it’s quite different from the ones I bought from Rare Plants in England.  This is a simpler, less complex flower and quite nice in its own right.  Of course it is every bit as tiny as the others (get out your magnifying glass to enjoy the beauty!).

Ponerorchis graminifolia (Asiatica source)

Ponerorchis graminifolia (Asiatica source)

3 comments on “Golden Eggs in the Wildflower Garden

    1. jw

      Interesting bug links. I can’t find any reference to the Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) as the host plant which would help in the ID. Seems to be more than one bug that produces golden eggs 🙂

  1. Holly Chase

    Wonderful photos, John. What is it about BLUE flowers that beguile us so?

    I wish you were coming with us to Turkey, on our botanical tour this October. Our Turkish botanist ( a university prof who is an orchid authority), various local nature guides, and I have other duties on our tours, so it’s nice when a tour member, a good photographer, takes photos to share.

    I know it’s rather hard to imagine fall right now, with spring so late in the Northeast, but any plant-fancier or photographer who wants to visually “capture” myriad endemic crocuses, sternbergias, cyclamen, and galanthus at high elevations in the Toros Mts, should come along. The migratory bee-keepers will be roaming through the pine forests and villagers will be simmering pots of grapes, sumac blossoms, and juniper berries to make those distinctive Turkish fruit syrups known as pekmez…

    I’m trapped inside with my A/C on (here in sticky Florida now) and so dreams of Mediterranean Turkey in October, along with your cooling blue blooms today, make a nice respite.

    We just finished the trip brochures, but they are NOT on my website (full itineraries mailed only on request, so as not to over advertise fragile habitats). But there is an overview:

    http://hollychase.com/botanical-tours/

    Thanks for your lovely shots==