A Primula Arrives Early to the Party

Primula allionii 'Wharfdale Ling' peeking out

Primula allionii ‘Wharfdale Ling’ peeking out

I was surprised to see a glint of color in the Alpine bed yesterday.  Indeed it was actually a first flower from the exquisite little Primula allionii ‘Wharfdale Ling’.  This tiny little primula species is relatively rare in the wild but has been widely propagated and hybridized because of the size and beauty of the flowers for such a small plant.  Jim Jermyn has a great write-up on this species and its natural growing conditions.  I’ve just finished my seed order for the Scottish Rock Garden Society seed exchange and I’ve included a different Primula allionii selection on my list.  This one has the honor of being the first plant to flower in the new alpine bed — months ahead of time.

Early blossom on Primula allionii 'Wharfdale Ling'

Early blossom on Primula allionii ‘Wharfdale Ling’

It’s been generally a great week for gardening.  Crisp mornings but sunny afternoons.  I spent this afternoon cleaning the moss off of pots in the greenhouse.  But not before noting that yet another oxalis species had come into flower.

Oxalis densa

Oxalis densa

Notice the little hairy leaves.  The oxalis are all so different.  The buds on these are yet another distinctive image — I need to get a picture.  Back to the moss, it  had really built up on some of the small bulb pots.  As it turns out when you use a gravel top dressing the moss just lifts out taking the some of the old gravel with it and doesn’t disturb the underlying bulbs.  And then you just replace the gravel.

We took off one day on an excursion looking at garden art at Alden Farms and the unusual plants at Susanna Farms.  Many of the items at Susanna Farms were landscaping specimens beyond our price range, but we did come back with two very nice additions.

Rhododendron nakaharai 'Pink ES'

Rhododendron nakaharai ‘Pink ES’

The fall coloring is just great on this prostrate rhodie.  It will be interesting to see how it flowers out in the spring.  It’s said the flowers appear at nearly the end of the rhododendron season which would make them very late indeed.

Crytomeria japonica 'Little Diamond'

Crytomeria japonica ‘Little Diamond’

We have always liked Cryptomeria.  Our biggest one is 30-40 feet high at the back of the yard.  This one should stay within the 2-3 ft range.

The garden art visit was equally fun.  We met David Therriault, stone designer and walked through his sculptures.  He works mostly with salvaged materials and repurposes them into artwork.  We saw several pieces that we liked (it’s Beth’s birthday present), but the one which was our favorite seemed to large for the new garden that we’ve built this fall.  However, when we came home it seemed like it could fit after all.  To check our perceptions I photoshopped a copy of the sculpture into place, and indeed, we think it fits.

Garden without totem

Garden without totem

 

Garden with Totem

Garden with Totem

This is all part of our growing love for stone of all sorts.  We went to the local stone dealer yesterday and came home with some very pretty pieces from their loose rubble.  It’s like buying plants except you don’t have to water them…

Stone with character

Stone with character

Silverlake strip

Silverlake strip

Emmitsburg-Brown

Emmitsburg-Brown

One comment on “A Primula Arrives Early to the Party

  1. Bill Willis

    I love the macro photo of the Primula allionii.