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Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day June 2020

Asiatic Lily ‘Netty’s Pride’

Well there are many flowers blooming for this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day, but the lilies have captured my attention.  These are just the first of the lilies coming down the pike but they capture the eye when you walk about the yard.  Besides ‘Netty’s Pride’, another contender for attention is this additional Asiatic hybrid.

Asiatic Lily ‘Forever Susan’

In Beth’s herb bed we have a brilliant yellow whose name has long since passed.

Yellow Asiatic Lily in the Herb bed

Then there also the Martagon lilies with their clustered flowers.

Martagon Lily ‘Arabian Knight’

Martagon Lily ‘Claude Shride’

This last one is a striking red.  So much so even in the catalog that I have already ordered more for planting this fall even before I saw this one in bloom.  We are beginning to attribute such actions to covid-brain around here…

A lily-wannabe that is pretty in its own right is the Alstromeria ‘Sweet Laura’.

Alstromeria ‘Sweet Laura’

Among the other highlights are two gentians with lovely blue flowers

Gentiana dahurica

Gentiana septemfida (Summer Gentian)

And then there is this Asclepias cultivar with stunning clusters of bright yellow flowers.

Asclepias tuberosa ‘Hello Yellow’

Nearby is Hypericum having one of its most floriferous years ever.

St. John’s Wort (Hypericum calycinum)

In many places we have triteleia showing up from plantings that go back many years.

Triteleia laxa ‘Queen fabiola’

And for a spot of orange we added a little calceolaria this year from Sequim Rare Plants out in Washington State.  I’m sure it’s not hardy here, but worth the experiment.

Calceolaria integrifolia ‘Kentish Hero’

A delightful surprise was to see the pointy little head of the arisaema candidissimum finally show up.

Arisaema candidissimum emerging

Every year I am at the point of giving up on this plant given that many other arisaemas have long since put up there leaves.  And then lo and behold, up it comes.  And it’s relative in lateness arisaema fargesii arose the next day.  Both are stunning arisaemas and well worth the wait.

Of course it’s important to add that around here fruit and vegetables are dominating the gardening scene.  We’ve been picking strawberries for three weeks and now the raspberries and blueberries are bursting forth.

Raspberries coming ripe

We also have cherries from the wild trees in the forest.

Wild Cherries in our woods

We figure these are seedling planted by the birds from our original orchard trees (and they are now 30-40 ft tall).  I picked some from the best tree today.

Best Wild Cherry Tree

 

 

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day May 2020

First Bearded Iris of the season

Well here we are in mid-May for Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day in what will be a memorable year for everyone.  Gardening supplies are selling out everywhere as people to turn to something they can do at home.  At the same time the season has numerous variable weather days ranging from a very early springtime to an actual freeze on May 9th, something I’ve never seen here before.

Ice off of tarp

We covered the raised bed with tarps and when it rained overnight we found sheets of ice on the tarps in the morning.  Oddly enough not a single plant was harmed in the process.

There are so many flowers everywhere it is hard to know where to start.  The front circle bed abounds with allium that have been spreading all around the garden in between penstemon and centaurea.

Front bed with alliums

Centaurea montana

Also in the front yard we have a self-expanding garden of wood poppies.

Wood poppy (Stylophorum diphyllum)

And near by are their white-colored friends.

Snow Poppy (Eomecom chionantha)

Both are willing to spread everywhere but I try to limit them to the front yard where the deer will occasionally browse.

In the back yard the tree peonies have been magnificent.

White Tree Peony

White Tree Peony

Even one of the species peonies is still blooming.

Paonia obovata

We are beginning to see the first of the Itoh and herbaceous peonies.

Peony ‘Scarlet O’Hara’

In addition to the bearded Iris at the beginning of this post there is the regular blooming of the Japanese Roof Iris and a delightful new small yellow Pacific Coast Hybrid that I got this year from Sequim Rare Plants.

Japanese Roof Iris (Iris tectorum)

PCH Iris ‘Mandalay Bay’

The Rhododendrons are making their annual appearance.

Exbury hybrid Azalea ‘Gibraltar’

Rhododendron ‘Viscosepala’

This last one is a particular favorite.  The glorious scent wafts onto the deck all day long.  It has a wonderful history going back to the mid-1800’s (see this detailed write-up from the American Rhododendron Society.

Rhododendron ‘Viscosepala’

This is also the time of year when the various podophyllums are putting out their flowers.

Podophyllum pleianthum

Podophyllum pleianthum flower

Podophyllum delavayi

Podophyllum delavayi flower

Then there are various treasures to be found around the yard.  These are things I would be sure to point out if we touring together.

Glaucidium palmatum

Calochortus splendens ‘Cupido’

Iris gracilipes

Scilla peruviana

Normally this Scilla is very iffy for us outside but we had such a mild winter it has come out flowering as if were at home in the mediterranean.

Allium nevskianum

Disporum cantoniense ‘Night Heron’

Looking back through the monument bed we see a fully flowering Delaware Valley White

Path in monument garden

and a special aquilegia

Aquilegia buergeriana

Ending back at the Alpine bed we see a very robust flowering of one of the clumps of dianthus

Alpine bed, south side

Dianthus petraeus subsp. petraeus

Dianthus petraeus subsp. petraeus

Finally I will close with a new Edraianthus in a trough at the end of the greenhouse.

Edraianthus graminifolius

Stay healthy and garden well…

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day April 2020

Paonia macrophylla (?)

It is a very flower-filled time for the GBBD post.  Like everyone, we have flowers blooming everywhere and part of my dilemma is always where to focus my time and attention.  The species peony shown above led me down an internet road trying to untangle the details of peonies with glabrous styles, purple anthers, and smooth undersides of leaves.  On top of that it was just a lovely little peony that I cannot recall acquiring.  

There are many other peonies, either flowering or about to flower.  I have to admit that I am partial to the species peonies.

Paonia daurica

Paeonia ostii

Nearby the Iris japonica are taking over their region of the garden.

Iris japonica ‘Eco Easter’

Iris japonica ‘Wuhan Angel’

These are definitely spreaders so you want to choose their location with care.  

Similarly I’ve noticed how some of the anemones and primroses are happy to spread each year.

Primula sieboldii ‘Chubby One’

Thinking of spreaders, I have tried to move the Cascadian Wallflower from parts of the garden each year and it always finds a new place to make an appearance.  But it’s so lovely it’s hard to not just appreciate it.

Erysimum arenicola (?)

In addition an orange flowered wallflower reappeared from a wildflower mix that went in last year.

Wallflower as perennial

Common but beautiful orange wallflower (Erysimum)

The yard as a whole is blessed by the things which happen in the mid-Atlantic April, like azaleas, viburnums, dogwood, and flowering fruit trees.

Back bed springtime

Coral Bells Azalea under Viburnum carcephalum (Fragrant Snowball)

While out in the orchard, things are in extravagant bloom this year.

Granny Smith Apples in bloom

Flowers galore on Spitzenburg apple

The Spitzenburg is one of the finest apples you will ever taste, but when you look at the trunk of this little guy you have to be grateful that it is producing any apples at all.

Trunk of Spitzenburg

Hidden around the yard are still some smaller gems that i look forward to each year.

Hylomecon japonicum

Anomonella thalictrum single pink

Trillium pusillum ‘Roadrunner’

Arisaema ringens

And when we go back to the troughs, the first Gentiana is showing up.

Gentiana acaulis

The alpine beds themselves are both chock full of interesting things like daphnes, stonecress, iris, poppies and the like.

Alpine bed north side

Alpine bed south side

Particularly noteworthy is a little Lewisia returning to claim its space.

Lewisia longipetala ‘Little Raspberry’

and an Androsace which is always welcome.

Androsace sarmentosa ‘Rock Jasmine’

As well as the always striking Bird’s Foot Violet.

Viola pedata

In the greenhouse itself are still things which worth sharing or bringing into the house.  The Ferrarias have been blooming since February.

Ferraria ferrariola

Other South Africans include two Ixias, tritonias, and Ornithogalums.

Ixia dubia (?)

Ixia hybrid on a 30″ stem

Tritonia crocata ‘Princess Beatrix’

Ornithogalum dubium

And, of course, we continue to harvest daffodils from our years of planting.

Arguros and other daffodils

Hoping this post finds the reader healthy and able to enjoy the spring.

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day February 2020

Narcissus ‘Rinjveld’s Early Sensation’

It’s been a strange winter so far for this Garden Bloggers report.  No real snowfall and temperatures that have fallen to 20 degrees on occasion but have mostly been well above normal, even near records for some days.  Total precipitation is about 50% above normal.  The result is that many flowers are up earlier than usual but get blasted in between glorious flowerings.  A case in point is the camellias which have had many flowers but then get browned off when the temperature dips.

Camellia japonica red

Camellia japonica ‘Pink’

On the whole we are just enjoying some our early spring flowers earlier than usual.

Adonis amurensis ‘Fukujukai’

Jeffersonia dubia

Eranthis hyemalis

The Hellebores are particularly resilient at this time of year.

Helleborus viridis

Helleborus x hybridus PDN Yellow

Helleborus x lemonnierae ‘Walberton’s Rosemary’

This is one of the nicest new hybrids.

Of course one also expects to see snowdrops at this time of year, but they are spreading nicely.

Galanthus nivalis ‘Viridapice’

Galanthus nivalis ‘Blewbury Tart’

The first full flowering in the alpine bed is the Draba hispanica.

Draba hispanica

In the greenhouse the Cyrtanthus breviflorus and mackenii are flowering.

Cyrtanthus breviflorus

And our only Geissorhiza is in flower too.

Geissorhiza inaequalis

Finally we made two trips to Gettysburg Gardens where I discovered some lovely examples of Veldtheimia bracteata.

Veldtheimia bracteata

These are magnificent plants, sometime called forest lilies, that can easily grow to 2 ft tall with long lasting flowers.

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day January 2020

Camellia japonica red

Ok, I’ve just counted and I’ve done 400 posts already.  That’s a lot of flowers no matter how I add it up.  

It’s hard not to lead off this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day with this stunning Camellia Japonica which has been flowering since November.  It probably has 20 blooms on it at this point.  Although I expect they will get burnt off with the next hard freeze, it has been a pleasure to see this one flowering on a daily basis with the very mild winter we have had thus far.

Similarly the red Japanese quince is getting ahead of itself.

Japanese Quince

The Hellebores are less surprising.  The niger types are often in flower during any warm spell.

Helleborus niger ‘HGC Jacob’

What was a surprise was to see this new pink hybrid also in flower.

Helleborus x lemonnierae ‘Walberton’s Rosemary’

This was new acquisition from Plant Delights.  It’s been flowering for almost 2 weeks now.

The various snowdrops are up and doing what snowdrops are meant to do.

Snowdrops

The yellow witch hazel (Arnold’s Promise) is also in flower but it was too windy to get good photos today.  The Adonis are popping up and getting ready to bloom.

Adonis lined up ready to go

The biggest surprise from the outdoor flowers is this little Lewisia in the Alpine bed.

Lewisia (probably cotyledon)

In the greenhouse we have many oxalis and narcissus blooming.

Narcissus romieuxii ‘Atlas Gold’

A little more surprising is this Silene that I grew from seed obtained through the North American Rock Garden Society’s seed exchange last year.

Silene yunnanensis

It really wanted to be outside but I forgot to plant it out last year.

We made a visit to Gettysburg Gardens last weekend and I brought back a number of treasures including this ground cover

Arisarum proboscideum (also known as mouse tails)

And finally let me close with this lovely hybrid cyrtanthus that I found there.

Cyrtanthus hybrid

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day December 2019

Camellia sasanqua hybrid

Well this GBBD posting is almost like an advertisement for camellias.  The winter has been very mild so far and not only are the fall camellias doing what they are supposed to do, but the spring camellias are getting into the act too.

Fall Camellia white

Red Fall Camellia

Red Spring Camellia starting to bloom

In addition I found this morning, for the first time, a bloom on a camellia japonica x sasanqua hybrid that we have been growing for several years.

Camellia x ‘Yume’

There aren’t a lot of other flowers out for December so the camellias really steal the show.  Here are few things I noticed.

Euphorbia still in bloom

Mahonia ‘Soft Caress’

Japanese Quince

The greenhouse has a few things to put forward besides the oxalis which continue to bloom

Freesia fucata

And the very first narcissus of the season

Narcissus catabricus ‘Silver Palace’

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day November 2019

Camellia sasanqua

Let me open this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day post with the Fall Camellia shown above.  We’ve had a few frosts so most of the outdoor flowers are gone, but the camellias persist and will take any few days of sunshine to blossom some more buds.  There even buds on the red Fall Camellia which has not flowered for five years, ever since I cut it way back after what I mistakenly thought was a killing freeze.

Red Fall Camellia

There are only a couple of other outside plants in flower including a remnant Fall Crocus which is arriving way after its brethren.

Fall Crocus

Note to file — plant more Fall Crocus next year.

In one of the troughs that I inherited from Terry Partridge has a sedum that sends up a vertical spike that starts out white and then turns red after the frost hits it.

Sedum in trough before frost

Sedum in trough after frost

Still attractively in flower in either case.

For other flowers we need to go inside.

The Amazon Lily is flowering again which it does at least twice a year for us.

Amazon Lily

It’s been in the same pot with minimal care for decades.  We really should give it a transplant.

Another star of the show came in from the greenhouse.

Nerine undulata

I really like the Nerines in general, but this one has a particularly attractive flower that has been with us for at least 2 weeks now.

I’ve also brought in a little cyclamen that is expanding out of its current pot.

Cyclamen hederifolium ‘Perlenteppich’

The leaves are just remarkable.

Also in the greenhouse is the usual assortment of oxalis and this coloful Bulbine.

Bulbine frutescens

Finally a Moraea to round out the show.

Moraea polystachys

 

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day September 2019

Eastern Swallowtail (Dark Form) on Zinnia

It’s appropriate to feature a zinnia for this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day post because they are all over the place — in vegetable garden, by the driveway, and in the orchard.  It’s hard to disagree with a flower that comes from seed so easily and lasts all season long.  In fact zinnias were the first flower we planted when we got inspired to start gardening fifty years ago.  We read a book by Jeanne Darlington (Grow Your Own) that led us to scratch a little garden plot next to our student housing.  There have been a lot more flowers since …

Typically we have Dahlias and Glads in the vegetable garden just for picking.

Dahlia ‘Bodacious’

And son Josh planted a lot of wildflowers around the property this spring.

California Poppy reblooming

Including especially zinnias and sage in the orchard, but also this particularly pretty variety of basil.

Basil in flower

My eye tends to get distracted by the perennials, especially those that are giving a bonus rebloom.

Daphne x susannae ‘Tage Lundell’

Delosperma congestum ‘Gold Nugget’

There is also a nice little patch of Colchicum in with the wildflowers in the backyard.

Colchicum ‘Byzantium’

As you walk down the driveway it’s hard not to notice the Viburnum with it’s berries hanging out into the drive.

Viburnum wrightii

In the greenhouse I found the Scilla maderensis budding up a few days ago.

Scilla maderensis

And now the flowers are opening up.

Scilla maderensis opening up

This is also the oxalis time of the year.

Oxalis bowiei

One after another, the Oxalis break into bloom from early September into February.

I’ve also found myself reading up about Zephyranthes and their close relatives Habranthus.  These are both part of the Amaryllis family and they are spectacularly easy to grow.   They are often called rain lilies because the rapid appearance of the flowers in late summer.  I’ve had the yellow forms (like Zephyranthes smalli and Z. jonesi, or Habranthus texensis) for a number of years, but what I’m discovering is that the pink and red forms of the family are really special.

This little Habranthus has white flowers that are tinged pink on the outside.

Habranthus magnoi

And these two Zephyranthes are both of the pink persuasion mixed with white.

Zephyranthes miradorensis

Zephyranthes labuffarosea

This last one is especially large for a Zephyranthes.  It was found in Mexico on a red mountain, therefore it’s name.  Most of the Zephyranthes prefer a southern climate (say zone 8), but they are easy to overwinter in a pot.  They make abundant seeds which will start popping up in other pots if you don’t pay attention.  I’ve got a number of pots that I thought were tritoma or babiana or some other bulb, only to realize that they were actually Zephyranthes volunteering to use an empty pot.