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It’s Adonis Springtime

Adonis ‘Chichibu Beni’

All it took was a lovely 50 degree day to bring lots of flowers into bloom.  Especially lovely is this spectacular Adonis from the Chichibu mountain region of Japan.  The entire six year-old plant keeps slowly expanding and it is worth the wait.

Adonis ‘Chichibu Beni’ in the late afternoon light

And I discovered this year that the seed that I planted from this flower in 2013 has finally yielded a flower as well.

Adonis ‘Chichibu Beni’ Seedling

Of course the yellow flowered Adonis cannot be ignored on a sunny day either

Adonis ‘fukujukai’

These intrepid early flowers had company today.  Even the Jeffersonia, which is way out of correct timing, has flowers appearing.

Jeffersonia dubia

And I discovered as I scraped leaves away that the Helleborus thibetanus was also in flower under the leaves.

Helleborus thibetanus

It was not surprising to see that more of the Eranthis are also in bloom.

Eranthis hyemalis ‘Schwelglanz’

And the alpine bed had the first flowers on the very nice Draba hispanica.

Draba hispanica

Of course, I shouldn’t ignore two little Moraeas that are blooming in the greenhouse.

Moraea macronyx

Moraea ciliata

Altogether it was really nice to follow up the snowfall of yesterday with work in the yard pulling off the leaves and revealing treasures.

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day February 2018

The vegetable garden in winter

I took this picture last week after a particularly pretty ice storm.  It’s very representative of the kind of winter we’ve had and sort of a nice lead into this month’s Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day.  At the same time the Adonis, usually my first striking blooms of the season, were tightly held in bud waiting for a warm day.

Adonis ‘fukujukai’ in the snow

But yesterday (what a difference a few days makes) the same Adonis were fully reveling in the sunshine.  Full credit to Beth for catching this colorful image of the Adonis while I was heading back from the west coast.

Adonis ‘fukujukai’

The lesser petaled species Adonis were also out in bloom.

Adonis amurensis

As were some of the winter stalwarts like the snowdrops and witch hazel.

Snowdrop (Galanthus elwesii)

Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’

This plant continues to show some of the yellowish flowers that I noticed earlier in the season, together with some really fine red flowers.

And just for today the first Winter Aconite have appeared on the scene.

Winter Aconite (Eranthis hyemalis)

In the greenhouse one of my favorite plants of the season is in flower.

Hesperantha paucifolia

It’s because of this Hesperantha that I’ve added several Hesperantha to my seed exchange requests.

There is a perfectly lovely compact Oxalis in full flower right now.  Note the red barber pole striping on the unopened buds.

Oxalis densa

And also a very nice new Oxalis that came to me via a Pacific Bulb Exchange distribution last fall.

Oxalis purpurea ‘Garnet’

Oxalis purpurea ‘Garnet’ in bud

Notice the yellow coloring in the unopened bud.  The red leaves are striking.

So with the nice start from the Adonis we are now facing more snow and freezing weather tomorrow.  So winter isn’t done with us yet.

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day January 2018

Helleborus niger ‘HGC Jacob’

This lonely Christmas Rose is representative of what is going on outside for this January’s Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day.  The temperatures got down to 2 degrees after Christmas and have only just begun to recover.  We did get a few days in the fifties but now it’s gotten cold again.  It was just enough to get the first snowdrops to declare the end of winter.

1st snowdrops

But mostly this image of a Camellia flower more accurately states the wintry conditions.

Camellia japonica which was red last month

As usual I retreat into the greenhouse for flowery solace in January.  The Narcissus ‘Silver Palace’ has been blooming for a month.

Narcisus catabricus ‘Silver Palace’

And it’s now joined by one of its yellow flowered brethren.

Narcissus ‘Roy Herold Seedling’

There is one peculiarity that I noted in walking the yard today.  The Witch Hazel Diane which normally blooms after the more common Chinese Witch Hazel has already bloomed on some of it’s branches but they are yellow.  This is really strange for a plant known for it’s orange-red flowers.

Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’ with yellow flowers

Other branches are getting ready to bloom red, and I know these yellow branches have been red in the past.

Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’

I am mystified.

I’ll close on this cold January day with the sparkling red of last year’s Arisaema fruit and the promise of Adonis blossoms to come.

Arisaema sikokianum fruit

Adonis buds

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day May 2017

Horned Poppy (Glaucium flavum)

Wow, a very busy day yesterday in gardenland.  I discovered the horned poppy shown above had returned after a year’s absence in flowering as I was catching up with the vegetable garden on an absolutely gorgeous spring day here in Maryland.  My cup runneth over with chores at this time of year, but the weather has been most cooperative (at last!).  I tilled the garden, finished weeding the strawberries, planted out the veggies started in the basement, seeded much of the rest of the garden, put in more glads and dahlias, and meanwhile Beth and Josh were weeding and pruning like mad.

Getting the garden planted

As usual on Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day I will share some of the flowers of interest blooming around the yard.  It’s worthwhile to step back from my close-up images to see the wide array of flowering plants right now.

Front Garden Circle

I’ve noticed that some folks tend to think of ‘garden’ as the larger scale perspective, whereas I often get caught up with the specific flowers.  This little blossom on the Kalmiopsis leachiana, for example, is almost hidden amidst the surrounding Daphne.

Kalmiopsis leachiana amid daphne spent flowers

Another small distinctive flower that first bloomed last fall and is repeating already is this little Delphinium.

Delphinium cashmerianum

A constant volunteer for us is this little pink columbine that we inherited from Beth’s mother.

Aquilegia light pink

In the garden leading to the greenhouse gateway, there is a floriferous Callirhoe variant.

Callirhoe involucrata var. lineariloba ‘Logan Calhoun’

A quite distinctive plant is this allium which is just finished blooming and looks like it has little onions for seed pods.

Allium (nectaroscordum) tripedale

The very fragrant Rhododendron ‘Viscosepala’ is also just at the end of its blooming.

Rhododendron ‘Viscosepala’

By the back porch there is a lovely Bougainvillea that has overwintered in the greenhouse.

Bougainvillea pink and white

Of course, it’s hard not to miss the peonies in May.

Paonia ‘Sweet Shelly’

We also have yellow flowered peony that has been with us for thirty years.

Yellow Shrub Peony

The name has long since disappeared.

And the old stalwart, Festiva Maxima.

Paonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

We brought this one with us from Alexandria in 1975 and have planted it in many places around the property.  It thrives everywhere, even in the pasture with no real care.  The fragrance is wonderful and they make great cut flowers.

Paonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Another plant that thrives on neglect is Baptisia.

Baptisia x variicolor ‘Twilite Prairieblues’

These grow right by the pasture with no assistance whatsoever.

The various iris species also have a celebration time in May.

Bearded Iris pink cultivar

Iris tectorum

At the back of the garage we have very large Black Lace Elderberry that is fully in flower right now.

Black Lace Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

One of my favorite alpine plants is the Edrianthus pumilo which grows in a nicely formed cushion in the Large Trough by the greenhouse.

Edrianthus pumilo

Let me leave you with a couple of the birds which have shown up recently in the yard.  First a bluebird which is probably nested nearby.

Bluebird salute

And a Yellow-rumped warbler which is more likely just passing through but is the first instance I’ve seen on our hillside.

Yellow -rumped Warbler

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day

Anemonella thalictroides ‘Green Hurricane’

April is when all of the spring ephemerals are peaking.  The walk around the yard leads from one little charmer to the next.  Of course there are also many flowering trees at this time of year, like the redbuds, the cherries, the crabapples, etc., but I tend to get caught up in these unusual flowers that are not easy to find.  Even the standard Anemonellas are quite nice and they are spreading around the yard.

Anemonella thalictroides

The last of the Adonis is making its appearance.

Adonis vernalis

The foliage for this one is very ferny.

This is when trout lilies are peaking.  They continue to expand their allocated space in the raised bed next to the deck.

Erythronium americanum

But their more usual relatives can also be found in other parts of the yard.

Erythronium dens-canis ‘Rose Queen’

One of the reliable flowers for the same week as the trout lilies are the bloodroots, and the longest lasting are the multi-flowered versions.

Sanguinaria canadensis ‘Multiplex’

There are still a few Hepaticas to be found

Hepatica nobilis ‘Lithuanian Blue’

And the Trilliums are starting to appear.  One of my favorites is Roadrunner.

Trillium pusillum ‘Roadrunner’

One of the Anemones is a very pretty light pink.  They are great shade flowers.

Anemone nemerosa ‘Rosea’

Back at the alpine bed we have a wonderful display of Aubrietia.

Aubrietia ‘Blue Beauty’

Nearby there is a stunning little dwarf Aquilegia

Aquilegia flabellata ‘Nana’

On the sunny side there is a lovely Delosperma, Gold Nugget.

Delosperma congestum ‘Gold Nugget’

In the original Large Trough there is another Delosperma that is an appealing combination of red and white.

Delosperma alpina

In the greenhouse there is a new Hippeastrum in flower.

Hippeastrum striatum

And just to finish with examples of the flowering trees that can be found all around the yard right now.

There is in particular the Viburnum x carlcephalum which is a hybrid with Viburnum carlesi in it’s background.  It’s the most fragrant Viburnum that I know.

Viburnum x carlcephalum

And then, of course, the Kwanzan Cherry that dominates our backyard.

Kwanzan Cherry

This is what is happening at our yard for Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day this month.  What is happening in your garden?

Jewels of Spring

Hepatica americana pink

It’s that time of year when I wish each day would linger so that we can enjoy all the jewels of springtime that are popping up day by day.  I’m so busy outside that I’ve not kept up with recording all the flowers coming into bloom right now.  The spring ephemerals are always at the top of my enjoyment list.  Many of them are small, transitory, and wonderfully beautiful.  Hepaticas come to mind with their small hairy leaves and colorful stamens.

Hepatica japonica purple

Hepatica japonica red and white

But there are many competitors for my eye.  Here are a few that have come in the last few weeks.

Chionodoxa forbesii ‘Blue Giant’

Chionodoxa forbesii ‘Pink Giant’

Pulsatilla grandis

Primula allionii ‘Wharfefdale Ling’

Geum reptans

This is a new plant grown from seed obtained from the Scottish Rock Garden Club seed exchange last year.

Corydalis kusnetzovii x C.solida ‘Cherry Lady’

A new addition from Augis Bulbs last summer.

Corydalis solida ‘Beth Evans’

Erythronium dens-canis ‘Rose Queen’

Jeffersonia diphylla

Sanguinaria canadensis ‘Multiplex’

Arisaema ringens

Anemone blanda ‘Violet Star’

Spring Beauty ‘Clatonia virginica’

Fessia hohenackeri (note the stamens)

A favorite combo – Chionodoxa and Anemone blanda

Of course, even in springtime the greenhouse is contributing it’s part.

Ferraria ferrariola

Moraea sp. MM 03-04a blue

Tritonia ‘Bermuda Sands’

Scilla peruviana

A wonderful plant.  I have some outside as well and last year they managed to flower.

Paradisea lusitanica

This comes on a 3 1/2 foot stalk.  I’m going to try putting it outside this year.  It’s marginally hardy in our area and it would be wonderful if it succeeds.

And then lastly the greenhouse provided a lot of color to the house

Clivia in the Entryway

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day March 2017

Pulsatilla grandis

We’ve just had messy snowfall that has undone a lot of the progress that we had made toward Springtime.  However, I will share a some of the flowers as they were before the snow, including the above lovely Pasque Flower which is about to show its purple flower in the new alpine bed.

Next to the Pulsatilla is this cute little Ornithogalum that flowers completely flat to the surface of the ground.

Ornithogalum fimbriatum

Ornithogalum fimbriatum

Also in the alpine bed is a new Corydalis

Corydalis shanginii ssp, ainae compact form

The hepaticas have continued to appear.  Small little jewels.

Hepatica nobilis v. pyrenaica

Hepatica nobilis pink

Hepatica americana

Hepatica japonica red/white

Meanwhile the Adonis is still providing interest.

Adonis amurensis ‘Sandanzaki’ backside

And we planted the wonderful Primula vulgaris after visiting England in 2008.  They are prospering in various parts of the yard.

Primula vulgaris under the apple tree

Meanwhile the first of the Glory of the Snow is starting to flower.

Glory of the Snow (Chionodoxa)

These are happily growing in the yard and the pasture.

Finally in the yard and the woods the scilla are growing now.

Scilla siberica ‘Spring Beauty’

The stamens are a wonderful shade of blue.

It’s hard to ignore some of the lovely things happening in the greenhouse as well.  In particular the ferrarias are now starting to flower.

Ferraria crispa

And some of the other south africans

Babiana rubrocyanea

Freesia ‘Red River’

Gladiolus sp.?

Sparaxis in a basket

Sparaxis hadeco hybrid pink

Spring is happening both outside and in the greenhouse.  What can you contribute to Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day.

 

Catching up

Adonis amurensis Chichibu Beni

We returned from traveling last week to find that the plants had been growing without us.  I need to do just a little catch up on what we found on our return because some of the plants are truly special.  The Adonis shown above is one of the best special varieties that you can buy for only a second mortgage on your garage.  Some of the others might require selling your garage.  This is the first year when it is clear that the clump is establishing itself and flourishing.

Adonis amurensis ‘Chichibu Beni’

It is truly spectacular.

Meanwhile the Adonis fujukaki is easily the most vigorous and visible of the Adonis clan.  At least around here.

Adonis ‘Fukujukai’

Meanwhile another that I have been calling garden variety Adonis amurensis has impressed me once again with the brilliant shiny petals.

Adonis ‘Shiny Petal’

I’m not sure that it is the standard species at all.  Note how it does not possess a normal number of stamens.  I’ve got a couple of seedlings coming along and I think they were from this plant.  We’ll see what happens.

Of course the one Adonis that originally caught my eye was Adonis amurensis ‘Sandanzaki’ which has this incredible lion’s mane of green feathers around the third series of petals.  Totally unique.

Adonis amurensis ‘Sandansaki’

Lest I am accused of Adonis mania, I will also note that we have a Jeffersonia that blooms well in advance of its colleagues.  And it is a standard Jeffersonia dubia with the violet petals, yellow stamens, and green ovary.

Jeffersonia dubia

But last year, my son gave me a special new Jeffersonia from Garden Visions that Darryl Probst brought back from Korea.  It has dark stamens and a purple ovary.

Jeffersonia dubia ‘Dark Centers’

It’s quite different and seems to be lasting quite well.

Another plant that is early for its kinfolk is the Hepatica nobilis pink.  Note the cute little stamens on these guys as well.

Hepatica nobilis pink

A pretty plant that shows up this time of year but never quite fulfills its potential is Helleborus thibetanus

Helleborus thibetanus

I have yet to get it to fully open to the camera.

Next to the greenhouse in a trough is a pretty little clump of Draba acaulis that seem to have suffered from last summer’s dryness.

Draba acaulis

And inside the greenhouse is another plant with remarkable colored stamens.

Scilla cilicica

Scilla cilicica stamens

These should be hardy outside and I need to give them a trial.

I had also promised more Moraeas and this is one.

Moraea vegeta

I also have an image to share of the fully open Enkianthus quinqueflorus.

Einkianthus quinqueflorus

Finally in the Alpine bed there was beautiful Fritillaria that was a distinctive showpiece.

Fritillaria stenanthera ‘Karatau’

Fritillaria stenanthera ‘Karatau’