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Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day September 2021

Dahlia ‘Bodacious’

We have a steady supply of flowers from the both the perennials and the picking garden for this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day.  The dahlia above has been flowering for most of the summer.  

The Tithonia in the garden give some idea of the good growing weather that we have had.

Tithonia in the garden

I always enjoy seeing the black and blue sage coming back because it was never supposed to be hardy in our area.  The bees enjoy it in particular.

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Bee on Salvia

Nearby the David Austin ‘Crocus Rose’ is making a comeback.

Crocus Rose

And right beside it the continually blooming Cestrum

Cestrum ‘Orange Peel’

I also enjoy that the Cyclamen comes up at this time of year both in the ground and in the greenhouse

Cyclamen hederifolium

Cyclamen graecum

Other flowers can be seen in the wildflower patches

Wildflower patch

Asters in wildflower patch

In the Alpine bed I discovered a Pulsatilla that is definitely blooming well out of season

Pulsatilla pratensis ‘bohemica’

Pulsatilla pratensis ‘bohemica’

In the greenhouse itself there is not only this striking Sinninglia species

Sinninglia sp.

But also a rather puzzling Buddleia which is coming up in nominally Gentianella pot.

Buddleia davidii

Elsewhere the berries in the yard are striking.

Blue Holly in berry

Viburnum wrightii

Viburnum wrightii

Finally to note once again that since we can’t survive on flowers alone, we have been bringing in lots of fruit.

Kieffer Pears (and a few liberty apples)

And for the first time Figs

Figs

I highly recommend homemade sourdough bread with brie, pear, and fig — yum…

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day July 2021

Stewartia japonica center

This is the middle of the gardening year with abundant flowers, never enough rain, and rarely the time to think about what chores to take on next.  For Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day I thought it appropriate to lead off with the exotic center of Stewartia Japonica.  The last flowers are just finishing up on this wonderful tree.   It not only flowers abundantly but has exquisite bark as well.

Stewartia japonica

But the dominant theme for this time of year is LILIES.  They are popping out like mad with their extravagant blooms.  Some are super tall (Scheherzade) or small (Madame Butterfly), but all are worth paying attention to.  Beth often brings them into the house for the fragrance.  Here are some of our lily companions.

Oriental Lily ‘Time Out’

Orienpet Lilium ‘Scheherazade’

Orienpet Lily ‘Anastasia’

Oriental Lily Star Gazer

Oriental Lily ‘Muscadet’

Oriental Lily ‘Casa Blanca’

Oriental Lily ‘Marco Polo’

Orienpet Lily Conca d’Or

Lilium ‘Madame Butterfly’

And at the same time that we are bringing lilies into the house the gladiolias are coming into bloom.

Gladiolus ‘Margaret Rose’

This year I noticed a particular red and white that is large and very frilly.  No name yet but I will research that.

Red and White Glad

In the garden there is a lovely long row of glads and dahlia with flowers still to come.

Glads in the garden

Our hardest working gardener is son Josh, and he has put a wall of sunflowers on the border of the garden

Sunflowers form the border of the vegetable garden

At the same time there was a volunteer sunflower in the vegetable garden that we just let grow.  I would estimate that it stands about 12 feet tall at this point.

Volunteer sunflower in the vegetable garden

I should mention that we put a barn owl box in the pasture.

Barn Owl Box

It’s too late this year but hopefully we get a family next year to take of some of the small critters.

Nearby is a wildflower patch that Josh created by covering the existing grasses with a tarp until he was ready to plant.  It’s worked out quite well.

Wildflower patch in the pasture

And then lastly, because we live not by flowers alone, here’s an update on the upcoming orchard fruit.

Redhaven peaches getting ripe

Kiefer pears in abundance

100 Years today! — A VERY SPECIAL BLOOM DAY

Frogs with Hydrangea

This month’s Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day falls upon my mother’s birthday — her 100th birthday, something very worth celebrating.  She has always loved flowers and we shared many moments of picking flowers and harvesting fruit.

Mom picks the Iris at Ball Rd

Mom in our garden in 2005

And though her body is slowly losing the capabilities it once had, as recently as 18 month ago (pre-covid) we could still share humor and memories.

Mom nursing center

So as I look around our garden today, I know that I owe a lot my appreciation for gardens and gardening to my parents and grandparents.  Today is also my father’s birthday (though he died more than 20 years ago) and their wedding anniversary.  They were married at the start of World War II and this courtship poem that he sent from his barracks is an example of the many poems my father wrote during their life together

A Letter

Meanwhile back here on the hillside we are harvesting gallons of peas and strawberries.  Last night we pitted many of the wild cherries that yield every year without spraying or special care.

Wild Cherries (Big Cherry Sue – the name of the tree)

We’re thinking we should at least plant the seeds

Cherry pits

The birds are happy to help out but they mostly work on the cherries that are beyond our reach.

Brown Thrasher with Cherry

Meanwhile the blueberries are starting to come in and they combine well with cherry juice.

Blueberries, ice cream, and wild cherry juice

But wait.  There are still flowers worth mentioning.  A lot of lilies are making their annual appearance.

Red Asiatic hybrid lily

Asiatic Lily ‘Forever Susan’

But also some special additional items worth noting.

Spigelia marilandica

Callirhoe involucrata (Wine Cups)

Asclepias tuberosa ‘Hello Yellow’

In the herb garden the perennials are making quite a statement as encouragement to the hummingbirds.

Monarda and Heliopsis in the herb garden

In the greenhouse there are many Zephyranthes popping up, but they don’t seem to follow any respect for my attempts at labeling.

Red Zephyranthes

I peeked in and saw this Hymenocallis blooming the other day (if you don’t catch it quickly it’s gone)

Hymenocallis guerreroensis

Before leaving this rather long post I do need to mention the Stewartia malacodendron.  We have grown Stewartia japonica for years and it’s a wonderful tree with beautiful flowers and bark.  It’s just about to come into bloom.  But its cousin S. malacondendron bloomed about two weeks ago and it has truly remarkable flowers, well worth the time invested in getting to grow outside of its North Carolina origins.

Stewartia malacodendron

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day May 2021

Delospermum cooperii

Well there are so many flowers at this time of the year for Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day it is difficult to keep track of them all.  I’ll give you just a smattering today and think back to all that I should have shared from the last month.  The little ice plant shown above is one of many plants exploding out of our alpine bed.  Very happy in our zone 7 landscape.

The species peonies and tree peonies are all done and we now moving on to the Itohs and the herbaceous

Peony ‘Sweet Shelly’

Itoh Peony ‘Morning Lilac’

Our row of bearded Iris is very happily blooming.

Pink Bearded Iris

Ever since we stopped weeding them amid the grass they have not had borers which used to be a perennial pain.

The early azaleas are pretty much done but the rhododendrons and deciduous azaleas are still blooming.

Rhododendron in the Camellias

Rhododendron ‘Chionoides’

Azalea Exbury hybrid ‘Klondyke’

I’ve particularly liked the compact and floriferous Calanthe discolor, a reliable favorite from the orchid family.

Calanthe discolor

The best of the Clematis remains Niobe though there are number of others in bloom

Clematis ‘Niobe’

It’s also worth noting that you can just eat flowers every night and we are always happy to see the strawberries arriving.  We have probably 75 feet of row for strawberries and peas that are just starting up.

Strawberries starting fruit

And in the orchard there are oh so many peaches, pears, and apples getting started.

Peaches coming along

Back in the alpine bed we have a number of nice items happening.

Alpine Daisy

Lewisia cotyledon

Ornithogalum exscapum amidst the Antennaria and Arnebia (Pussytoes and Sandwort)

Particularly nice is a little rock rose that I got from Wrightman’s Alpines last year after seeing them in the wild in Spain.

Cistus albanicus

I think are just barely hardy in Maryland but they seemed to make through the winter and you see the number of buds on them.

On one of the nights recently i caught the orchard looking particularly spending in the evening light and I’ll close with those images.

Evening light

Sunset

Path to small orchard

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day August 2018

Sunflower glory

It’s been hot but with enough rain to grow the weeds and sunflowers to magnificence.  So I will dedicate this belated Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day posting to the many sunflowers in the garden.

Sunflowers reaching for the sky

Some of them are easily ten feet tall.

Sunflowers way high up

But they are all wonderful for birds, bees, and humans alike.

Sunflower

Sunflower

A close namesake is the Mexican Sunflower

Tithonia rotundifolia with Bee

Tithonia are also very popular with bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

The vegetable garden also features gladiolus in quantity.

Gladiolus ‘Black Cherry’

The glads get displayed in the house.

Glads in the house

Along with several kinds of Cyrtanthus from the greenhouse.

Cyrtanthus sanguineus

Think of Cyrtanthus as smaller, more refined Amaryllis.

Also in the greenhouse right now are the little scilla relatives from Japan

Barnardia japonica

In the Alpine bed we find the most recent Gentian to come into bloom.

Gentiana paradoxa

The gentians, with the various species, span spring to fall with flowers, and all of them have delightful complex flowers.

Another little tidbit in flower right now is the anemonopsis

Anemonopsis macrophylla

I have been trying to flower one of these for years and this is the first one to share it’s dainty little waxy flowers.

Out in the orchard there are zinnias around the new apple trees.

Zinnias in the orchard

Of course gardeners do not survive on flowers alone.

Early August harvest basket

Japanese Pear ‘Nijiseiki’

Raspberries ripening again

That’s about it on a hot summer day.  We are running 15 inches over normal for rain to this point.  I’m wondering what the fall will bring…

 

 

 

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day April 2018

Sanguinaria canadensis ‘Snow Cone’

It’s Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day time and one of the fun parts of posting the monthly flowers is discovering those things that I had forgotten that I previously planted.  Amongst those is the Snow Cone Bloodroot pictured above.  All Bloodroots are good, this one is just a notch above.

Another newcomer to this blog is the single pink Anemonella from Hillside Nursery.  I went on quest last year for a strong pink Anemonella after seeing one at my son’s house in previous years.  He has since lost that plant which was exceptionally pink compared to the normal ‘Pink Pearl’ as it is now marketed.  In any case the one gracing our flower bed is very nice indeed.

Anemonella thalictroides ‘Single Pink’

Another Anemonella variant that I posted on recently is Green Hurricane.

Anemonella thalictroides ‘Green Hurricane’

Many of the Anemone’s are flowering right now too, including this very complex nemerosa.

Anemone nemorosa ‘bracteata pleniflora’

Close by are the Corydalis.

Corydalis solida ssp. incisa ‘Vermion Snow’

Corydalis turtschaninovii ‘Eric the Red’

This one, as I’ve noted before is named for the leaves, not the beautiful blue flowers.

One cannot pass by the Camellia bed which has many of the spring ephemerals without seeing one of my favorite trilliums.

Trillium pusillum ‘Roadrunner’

And the Leucojum are like snowdrops on steroids

Leucojum vernum

Even this far into April the Hellebores continue to provide wonderful flowers.  One that particularly catches my eye is Amethyst Gem.

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Amethyst Gem’

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Amethyst Gem’

This year I decided to give the Primula kisoana another try.  You have to be cautious with this because it wants to spread, so I put it in with the other thugs.

Primula kisoana

I had a minor revelation this week when I thought I had finally succeeded in bring a Shortia into bloom.  However, it turns out just to be Shortia lookalike, but pretty nonetheless.

Oxalis griffithii – Double Flowered

Back in the Alpine beds we have several returnees from previous years.

Aquilegia flabellata v. nana

Androsace barbulata

Primula allionii ‘Wharfedale Ling’

and a new Iris/potentilla combination

Iris babadaghica and Potentilla neumanniana ‘Orange Flame’

And it’s also worth noting that while I tend to get caught up in the small spring ephemerals, there are many other flowers about.  The early Rhododendron in the front yard is always spectacular.

Rhododendren carolinianum

Rhododendren carolinianum

There are many, many Daffodils, both in the yard and in the woods/pasture.

Narcissus ‘Monte Carlo’ in the woods

And the various fruit trees are mostly just coming into bloom.  The apricot is finished, the cherries and peaches just starting, and the Kieffer Pear is flowering as though there is no tomorrow.

Wild Cherries blooming in the woods

Kieffer pear tree

Kieffer pear tree blossoms

As I close this post, it’s worth noting that this spring is well behind previous years in terms of the number and progress of things in bloom.  But I’m good with that.  It gives more time to appreciate everything as it’s happening. 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day September 2017

Anemone x hybrida ‘Whirlwind’

Well, it’s fall here in Maryland and some of the usual suspects are providing our flowers for Bloom Day.  Japanese anemone are robust and reliable, as well as incredibly beautiful.

Anemone x hybrida ‘Whirlwind’

Some of the other regulars are in the following pictures.

Trycyrtis ‘Autumn Glow’

Alstroemeria ‘Sweet Laura’

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

St. John’s Wort ‘Hidcote’

In the wildflower patch, the wild asters are currently the star of the show, attracting insects of all sorts.

Wild Aster

In the cutting garden the standouts are the Tithonia.

Tithonia

Beth has shown they look really nice next to the Salvia ‘Black and Blue’.  They are also quite tall so it’s easy to see them from underneath as well.

Tithonia from underside

A similar color comes with the Atlantic Poppy which took forever to start blooming but now has a new flower every day.

Papaver atlanticum ‘Flore Pleno’

Inside the greenhouse we have blooming for the first time the Scilla maderensis.  It seems to open just a few of the flower elements per day so that it’s never completely in flower for us.

Scilla maderensis

It is nevertheless interesting and exotic which goes a long way to getting space in the greenhouse.

Looking down on Scilla Maderensis

The first of the Oxalis are coming into bloom now.

Oxalis melanostica ‘Ken Aslet’

There are three species blooming now, but the rest will extend the blooming season into January at least.

It’s worth noting that one does not live by flowers alone.  The garden fruits and vegetables have been abundant this year, pushing us to new recipes and uses for the crops…

Vegetable garden production

Kieffer Pears

Summer Crabapple Delight

Dolgo Crabapples

We have grown crabapples for many years in the front yard without ever making good use of the fruit.  Of course the abundant white flowers in the springtime are delightful and the pretty summertime fruit have always been appreciated but we never harvested them for eating.  Until now that is.  Our youngest son was inspired by the sprightly taste of the fruit.  He picked a bunch of them and made a couple of galettes, one with the crabapples and one with blueberries, apricots, and peaches.  Both were quite good, but the crabapple one was really special.  Think of the best rhubarb pie you’ve ever tasted.

Galettes in prep

Two Galettes

This was so good, that he went out this week and picked another batch of the crabapples.

Dolgo Crabapples

The remarkable thing about these little crabapples is that a very high percentage are without blemish or insect damage and this is without any spraying at all.  This is quite a contrast with our normal apple trees.

This is a very active time outdoors right now.  I thought I would also share another of the interesting spiders that we have run across.

Phidippus johnsoni jumping spider.

I always find the jumping spiders have considerable personality.

And another interesting tidbit is the arrival of the rain lilies.

Pink Rain Lily (Habranthus robustus)

We have grown these very hardy rain lilies for many years and they seem early this year but we had some strong rains and up they came.  I had also moved one of the Zephyranthes from the greenhouse last year and seems to be doing fine, though it is supposed to be a zone 8 plant.

Zephyranthes rosea

I would also note in passing that this is a good time to be gathering seeds for the various seed exchanges.  Some are quite easy to find like the Zephyranthes.

Zephyranthes seeds

Lastly I’ll close this post with one of the prettiest lilies I’ve come across (unnamed at the moment).

Unnamed Pink Lily