Christmas Trees Redux

Looking back at the Christmas tree post on January 4th it seemed like a good idea to see if I could track back and see where all the still living Christmas trees have ended up. I know that some died immediately and others just didn’t make it in this area. For instance there was a beautiful Fraser Fir that lasted for about 5-6 years and then one year just up and died. Anyway I did a head count today and there are still 8 other ex-Christmas trees hanging on. The list begins with a large White Pine that was a beautiful speciment until June of this year when we had a wind shear (mini-twister) come across our property. It took out three large 30 year-old apple trees, the top of a 50 foot high Tulip Poplar, a number of Black Cherries in the woods, and decapitated two very large White Pines including this one.

Decapitated White Pine

Decapitated White Pine

The third Christmas tree was a Colorado Spruce that I planted near the road. Because of its slow growth it got surrounded by a grove of Bigtooth Aspens and it’s definitely on the scraggly side.

Colorado Spruce

Colorado Spruce

The next one in order was a Douglas Fir which grew well for a number of years in very poor soil and then lost the leader. My guess is bagworm, but it’s hard to recall now. It is finally starting to show some new leader growth so I think we will let it keep going.

Douglas Fir with dead top leader

Douglas Fir with dead top leader

Then we come to another White Pine behind the garage. This one is looking really nice. Truth in advertising compells me to mention that it also sits within spitting distance of the septic field so that could explain it’s vigorous growth.

White Pine (Pinus strobus)

White Pine (Pinus strobus)

Then we have another Douglas Fir near the woods in some of the best soil on the property and it too was defoliated at the top by bagworms. The remainder still continues to grow but it looks pretty strange.

Douglas Fir with dead top-leader

Douglas Fir with dead top-leader

Next come two more White Pines next to the former Black Walnut site (and that’s another story to come). Each is growing fine but one needed to be limbed up to get rid of some vines. And then finally there is this year’s Douglas Fir newly planted at the bottom of the second pasture.

White Pine (Pinus strobus)

White Pine (Pinus strobus)

White Pine limbed up

White Pine headed up

 

Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) planted in 2008

Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) planted in 2008

5 comments on “Christmas Trees Redux

  1. Anna/Flowergardengirl

    Sad, but funny. Sorry about the twister that came through and tha is awful to take out such old trees. But it is funny to see all your Christmas trees in such a state.

    1. jw

      Well, I guess I have to look at it philosophically. When we moved here the owner had planted a forest of Scots Pine — nothing else just Scots Pine. They all died after about 25-30 years. They are just not long-lived in Maryland. But what succeeded the pines is a nice deciduous forest of oaks, ash and cherry. By the way your Agastache pictures are really nice! We like them too and plan to expand are groupings this year.

  2. josh

    I always forget about that Douglas Fir on the side! Kind of a classic Fir specialty-growth, I feel – fitting in where it can. Those White Pines really seem to blossom the best in the open environment – makes me wonder what the Firs and Spruces would look like if they grew as much as those early White Pines!
    nice journal of pics.

    1. jw

      Well, I mean to keep a much closer eye on this latest Douglas Fir. I think I would like to establish a little patch of specimen evergreens down in that corner of the pasture. There’s a twisted White Pine and two Redwoods lined out in the vegetable garden at the moment.