Wildflowers in Sedona

We managed some marvelous sunny days in Sedona but it was a little bit early for the full wildflower show.  In several days of walking about the hills and canyons near Sedona we did uncover a few choice specimens that are worth sharing.  In particular the trail to Bell Rock late one evening yielded a Fringed Gromwell (Lithospermum incisum) — at least that’s my ID.  There are other Stoneseeds in Arizona, but this one is noted for the fringes on the petals.  It’s a particularly pretty little flower whose detail I didn’t fully appreciate until I magnified the picture on the computer.

 

Fringed Gromwell (lithospermum incisum)

Fringed Gromwell (lithospermum incisum)

Further along on our sunset walk we found a small purple flower that looks to me to be some kind of Rock Cress, but the colors are different than most that I found online.  Jonathan subsequently identified it as Torrey’s Milkvetch (Astragalus calycosus)

Rock Cress ?

Torrey's Milkvetch (Astragalus calycosus)

Yesterday we took a hike up Boyden Canyon that took us through a long avenue of Pointleaf Manzanitas (Arctostaphylos pungens) with beautiful blueberry-like flowers.  It made me wonder about growing Manzanitas in the East.  I’ve never seen it but then again you never know until you try.  Certainly their bark makes them worth having independent of these lovely and plentiful flowers.

 

Manzanitas in flower along the trail

Manzanitas in flower along the trail

 

Pointleaf Mananita (Arctostaphylos pungens)

Pointleaf Mananita (Arctostaphylos pungens)

As we got further up into the Pines we saw Stellar’s Jays, a common bird of western forests.  I always find their electric blue coloring worthy of a picture.

 

Stellar's Jay

Stellar's Jay

There were many plants that looked like they were on the verge of flowering including some kind of lilies, anemones, Grape Holly, and a very pretty foliaged plant that I have finally concluded must be out of the Parsnip family.  I would be interested if anyone recognizes it.  My first thought was Dicentra, but now I think not.  I saw lots of these in the Pine woods.

 

Parsnip Family?

Parsnip Family?

3 comments on “Wildflowers in Sedona

  1. Jonathan

    Love the pix! The Lithospermum is a beauty.

    How about Astragalus calycosus for the small purple flower? See http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/Blue%20Purple%20Enlarged%20Photo%20Pages/astragalus%20calycosus.htm
    and the foliage at http://loco.biosci.arizona.edu/astragalus/images/Astragalus_images/Acalycosus.htm

    For the ferny parsnip family member, how about Lomatium parryi? Note the “distinguishing very finely cut, fern-like leaves and the red flower stems” on http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/Yellow%20Enlarged%20Photo%20Pages/lomatium%202.htm#Lomatium%20parryi
    and see also http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/Yellow%20Enlarged%20Photo%20Pages/lomatium.htm

    The USDA says both are found in the Sedona area: http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Arizona&statefips=04&symbol=LOPA

    1. jw

      Well, I think you are dead right on the Astragalus calycosus. I didn’t see that one and I will give that one a postive ID. I had seen the references to the Lomatium parryi and the various other Lomatiums and Cymopterus and just couldn’t give myself a convincing argument on that one. Would like to have seen it in full flower.

  2. Randy

    Again very very nice collection of photos I love the Manzanitas especially.