Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day March 2014

Iris histroides 'George'

Iris histroides ‘George’

Well, I’m late with posting this month for Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day, but the flowers have been popping out and I’ve been enjoying the outside for a change.  The Iris above is part of hundreds of bulbs that were added to the new Monolith garden last fall.  So far this the first one to flower besides the snowdrops and winter aconite.  Out in the front yard the winter aconite continue to spread, even creeping into the grass.

Winter Aconite (Eranthis hyemalis)

Winter Aconite (Eranthis hyemalis)

These all started with just a handful of bulbs.  They individually very pretty but as a mass they are striking.  Even the early bees are appreciative.

Winter Aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) with early Bee

Winter Aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) with early Bee

Anyone who is curious about Eranthis should see the January issue of the International Rock Gardener, which was dedicated to Eranthis.  If you are not familiar with the IRG it an online resource on the Scottish Rock Garden Club site with spectacular images and descriptions of unusual flowers.

The crocus are all over the lawn now as evidenced by this lovely example.

Crocus vernus 'Jeanne d'Arc'

Crocus vernus ‘Jeanne d’Arc’

A few Hellebores are open but mostly they are in the plump bud stage where they are also beautiful.

Hellebore 'Green Corsican'

Hellebore ‘Green Corsican’

In the woods I see that the Puschkinia are lighting up the path.

Pushkinia scilloides v. libanotica

Pushkinia scilloides v. libanotica

I always forget how early they are.

In one of the troughs a little Draba is beginning to flower.

Draba acaulis

Draba acaulis

I should have mentioned also that the house still has some spectacular flowers, none more striking that this Yellow Clivia.

Yellow Clivia in the dining room

Yellow Clivia in the dining room

Yellow Clivia (Clivia Miniata)

Yellow Clivia (Clivia Miniata)

There is also a new Moraea flowering in the greenhouse that I’ve never seen before.  The Moraeas tend to have wonderful detailed coloration when you look at them closely.

Moraea setifoia side view

Moraea setifoia side view

Moraea setifoia from above

Moraea setifoia from above

This one came from small bulbs distributed by the Pacific Bulb Society last July.

Let me close with some more images of truly unusual flowers that I’ve written about in recent posts.

Gymnospermium albertii

Gymnospermium albertii

Gymnospermium darwasicum

Gymnospermium darwasicum

Ferraria crispa full plant

Ferraria crispa full plant

Ferraria crispa

Ferraria crispa

It’s a great time of year!

4 comments on “Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day March 2014

  1. Chloris

    Snap! I showed my yellow Clivia on my Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day post. Your photos are stunning. I am going to have to find a Ferraria crispa it is absolutely gorgeous. I love the Moraea too. Did you grow it from seed?

    1. jw

      I have a lot of Moraea species coming along from seed but that particular one is a part of a cluster of small bulbs planted last July.

  2. Les

    Crocus have always reminded me of Easter eggs and Easter. It’s an association from a long ago childhood. ‘Jeanne D’arc’ makes me think of eggs for breakfast.

  3. rusty duck

    What a fantastic selection of plants, and photographs! I love the Puschkinia, especially if it is a woodlander, it looks almost translucent. Ferraria is very special too.