Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day for August 2013

inula magnifica

inula magnifica

It’s Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day once again — time to show what is blooming around the hillside.  The image above is from a raggedy looking plant on the hillside that I picked up at Stonecrop Gardens this spring.  The two standout items for the Inula are the brilliant yellow flowers and the fact that the deer leave the plant untouched.

It’s been a marvelously rainy summer, with so much consistent rainfall and almost fall-like temperatures now in August.  The plants have generally responded very well to all this rain, though I have seen a few casualties from plants that were expecting to have a dry rest in the summer — two little Drabas in particular seem to have gone to that final compost station.  But meanwhile the fall cyclamen are popping out their little purple heads and looking happier than ever.

Cyclamen pupurescens

Cyclamen pupurescens

There is even a little Cyclamen hederifolium with little white flowers with no leaves appearing in the Camellia bed.

Cyclamen hederifolium 'Fairy Wings'

Cyclamen hederifolium ‘Fairy Wings’

Out in the front garden, which is dominated by shasta daisy and black-eyed susans, one of perennials grown from seed this year is producing many beautiful little blue flowers against red buds.

Ceratostigma minus

Ceratostigma minus

This little plumbago was obtained by seed from the Czech plant hunter Vojtech Holubec after I saw his wonderful photo of the plant in it’s natural environment in Tibet.  I hadn’t appreciated that it is a well-known and popular horticultural plant in the U.S. under the name Plumbago larpetiae.  It’s said not to be hardy here, but I will probably experiment with it since my seed came from Tibet.

Above the plumbago stands a profusion of celosia stalks that are nearly 4 feet tall now.

Cramer's Amazon Celosia

Cramer’s Amazon Celosia

These came from seed obtained from Johnny’s this spring.  They grew easily and rapidly and make great cut flowers.

Dahlias are also doing well right now.  In particular a Bishop of Llandaff came back from overwintering in the garden where it is not supposed to be hardy.

Dahlia Bishop of Llandaff

Dahlia Bishop of Llandaff

In the shadier gardens the Toad Lilies are holding forth already.  The clump of Autumn Glow is expanding particularly rapidly.

Tricyrtis 'Autumn Glow'

Tricyrtis ‘Autumn Glow’

Trycirtis 'Tojen'

Trycirtis ‘Tojen’

If we stop by the greenhouse the Kamiopsis leachiana which I’ve mentioned in earlier posts has indeed decided to flower in the fall which is surprising for this rare spring flowering evergreen.

Kalmiopsis leachiana

Kalmiopsis leachiana

The vegetable garden is totally out of control and dominated by a large stand of Tithonia which attract a continuing stream of swallowtail butterflies.  I have never seen as many butterflies as we’ve had this year.

Zebra Swallowtail

Zebra Swallowtail

Finally let me close with a non-picture of the pretty yellow milkweed that we were growing.  It’s been completely stripped by the amazing Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars.

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar

There were a hundred or more eating at the milkweed and they took it all except for the seedpods.  Could this be their plan to make sure there was food for next year?

These are some of the most interesting plant happenings at Ball Rd.  What’s going on in your garden?

3 comments on “Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day for August 2013

  1. Lea

    Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful!
    Happy GBBD!
    Lea
    Lea’s Menagerie

  2. Les

    That celosia reminds me of one called ‘Flamingo Feathers’ we planted at my last job. It was a terrific bloomer and a very thuggish reseeder.

    1. jw

      Flamingo feathers was last year’s planting :). This one is a much bigger plant.